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Holiday Overview

Highlights

  • Ride the world`s longest bike descent from Tibet into Nepal
  • Watch the sun set on Mount Everest from Rongbuk
  • Comfortable twin-sharing accommodation throughout and all meals
  • Additional Nepali staff and support truck throughout the ride

This classic mountain biking holiday from Lhasa to Kathmandu originally pioneered by KE, is a long and demanding cycle ride on sometimes rough and ever changing roads across Tibet to Nepal. To make this cycling trip extra special, we have incorporated a trip away from the main highway, to bike to Everest Basecamp and the Rongbuk Monastery. Flying to Lhasa via a brief stay in Kathmandu, 3 essential nights are then spent getting used to the 3660 metre altitude. There is much to see in the days spent in and around the capital of Tibet, including the stunning Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple and the colourful Tibetan markets. We can also accompany devout pilgrims on the circuit known as the Barkor, which circles the Jokhang. A couple of short, easy bike rides around Lhasa assists with the group's acclimatisation and allows us to visit some of the many interesting temples and religious sites, such as the Sera Monastery which lies just a short distance outside the city. Setting off on our epic journey, there are 6 major passes to be cycled on the main Lhasa to Kathmandu route as it runs westwards, parallel to the Great Himalaya Chain which forms the border with the territories of Bhutan, Sikkim and Nepal to the South. Throughout this trip, the biking group will have full vehicle back-up (Land Cruisers and a support truck) and there may be times when all but the super fit need their bikes to be transported to the top of the next pass to enable us to keep to our ambitious schedule. Our groups are also accompanied by a Nepali team throughout to maintain the standard of service when in Tibet. The road traverses a high and dry plateau-land, which is punctuated by the unforgettable monastery towns of Gyantse, Shigatse and Shegar, as well as by several smaller settlements and nomadic Drogpa camps. On the detour away from the main route towards the Rongbuk Monastery, the route climbs through many hairpin bends to reach the Pang La, which affords breathtaking first views of all the Himalayan peaks including the awesome Mount Everest. We will spend 2 nights at Rongbuk Monastery close to Everest Basecamp before biking an alternative route, via the Lamma La, back to the Kathmandu highway. Back on the main route, we reach the edge of the Tibetan Plateau as we cycle across the double pass of the Lalung La and then Thang La. Now begins a mind-blowing bike descent of 4600 metres via the border town of Zangmu to the verdant valley of the Bhote Kosi River in Nepal. We spend a relaxing evening at the wonderful Borderlands on the banks of the Bhote Kosi, before a final climb up to the superbly situated town of Dhulikel on the edge of the Kathmandu Valley. KE has an unmatched wealth of experience that ensures a smooth ride for this, one of our most ambitious mountain bike programmes. KE has led more cycle tours along this challenging route than any other company in the world.

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Is this holiday for you?

ADVENTURE CYCLING. The Lhasa to Kathmandu ride can fairly claim to be the highest mountain biking in the world. It is an all-time classic biking adventure, best suited to mountain bikes fitted with semi-slick tyres. Hard-tail mountain bikes, especially 29'ers, work well on this route. The importance of 3 days, spent gently sightseeing around Lhasa cannot be over emphasised, as proper acclimatisation is vital to anyone hoping to complete this route. Our journey from Lhasa to Kathmandu crosses some very remote country and for 80% of the ride we are on the Tibetan Plateau, at an altitude of between 4000 and 5220 metres. Biking on the main Lhasa to Kathmandu road is fairly straightforward; it is all tarmac and continues to be improved by the Chinese. However, the altitude does make the riding a strenuous undertaking. Throughout the route, we will have the support of a back-up vehicle, and anyone who is not feeling up to riding a particular stage has the option to get in the support vehicle. On our ride into Everest Basecamp, we will encounter rough corrugated dirt tracks and there will be a chance to get off road using the small herders' paths which short-cut many of the switchback descents and climbs. This is one of our toughest biking adventures and will provide a real sustained workout. Constant long days, lots of climbing and usually in very remote locations. BIKE HIRE AVAILABLE LOCALLY.

Brief Itinerary

View in full
  • Meet at the group hotel in Kathmandu. Transfers from Kathmandu Airport are provided.
  • A free day in Kathmandu with a guided sightseeing tour amongst Buddhist and Hindu temple sites.
  • Fly across the Nepal Himalaya to Lhasa (3660m). Meet the Tibetan team and transfer to a city hotel.
  • Acclimatisation and sightseeing in Lhasa. Visit the Jokhang Temple and amazing Potala Palace.
  • Cycle out to the Sera Monastery. Afternoon for souvenir shopping or relaxing in a Barkor cafe.
  • Leaving Lhasa behind, cycle on recently laid tarmac to the foot (3800m) of the Khamba La.
  • Bike across the Khamba La (4794m) and drop down to the village of Nakartse.
  • Bike across the Karo La (5050m) and descend via several villages to the base of the Simi La.
  • Cross the Simi La, then ride a mostly downhill stage to Gyantse (4055m). Afternoon at the Kumbum.
  • A morning’s cycle ride to Shigatse (3950m). Explore the amazing Tashilhunpo Monastery after lunch.
  • A rest day. More time for monastery and market exploration and a second night in Shigatse.
  • Cycle to a lunch stop besides the Ra Chu River, then on to the foot (4290m) of the Tso La.
  • Cross the Tso La (4500m) with views of the Himalaya. Then, cycle via Lhatse to the base of the Gyamtso La.
  • Cross the Gyamtso La (5220m), descend to Shegar and turn towards Everest. Overnight at Chay Village.
  • Cycle up to the Pang La (5150m) for Everest views. Descend to our camp near Choesang.
  • Ride up the Rongbuk Monastery. Optional afternoon return ride to Everest Basecamp
  • An early start for the ride back to the main road via the Lamma La. Bike through Tingri to Tsamda.
  • Tibetan Plateau cycling, with views of Everest and Cho Oyu. Overnight below the Lalung La.
  • Cross the Lalung La, then the Thang La (5132m), with views of Shishapangma. Stop off close to Nyalam.
  • An epic day of descent, crossing into Nepal at Zangmu and continuing to the Borderlands Resort.
  • Short downhill ride, then up to Dhulikhel and a final short descent into Kathmandu.
  • Departure day. Transfers to Kathmandu Airport are provided.
2017
Sun 01 Oct - Sun 22 Oct Code TIMB/01/17/ Adult$5,625 Status Provisional dates Book now
More information
  • Lhasa to Kathmandu Mountain Bike Traverse
  • The departure reference for this tour is TIMB/01/17/
  • This tour begins on Sun 01 Oct and departs on Sun 22 Oct
  • The dates and prices for this departure are provisional. Please call our office for more information prior to confirming your booking.
  • Single Supplement $715 - Includes all group hotel nights in Kathmandu & Tibet (single tent not included)
  • Single Tent $175
The LAND ONLY dates and prices are for the itinerary, joining in Kathmandu. For clients making their own flight arrangements, Kathmandu Airport is the most convenient for transfers to the group hotel. Please refer to the 'Joining Arrangements and Transfers' for further details.

Flights SHOULD NOT be booked until you have received your booking confirmation and the departure is showing 'Guaranteed to Run' or 'Limited'.

Though improved relations between the UK and China have made travel to Tibet an easier prospect in recent times, please be aware that the Chinese authorities do have a history of opening and closing the Tibetan borders or refusing to issue visas without warning. For this reason we would highly recommend that if you are planning to travel to Tibet, you make a flight inclusive booking or book flights which are refundable in the event of your holiday having to be cancelled.


BOOK WITH KE CONFIDENCE - No surcharge guarantee

The price of our holidays can change depending on a variety of factors but unlike some other tour operators, KE have undertaken to guarantee the Land Only price of your holiday will not change after you have booked. The price when you book is the price you will pay, whether you are booking for this year or the next. Book early to avoid any tour price increases, get the best flight prices and take advantage of our 'No Surcharge Guarantee'.

KE Adventure Travel is a fully ATOL licensed and bonded tour operator with ABTA and AITO.

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Map & Itinerary

The Route

  • airport
  • point
  • peaks
  • trip direction
  • pass
  • bike

Holiday Itinerary

  • Meet at the group hotel in Kathmandu. Transfers from Kathmandu Airport are provided.

    Meet at the group hotel in Kathmandu. Transfers from Kathmandu Airport are provided. Depending on your arrival time, you may have the opportunity to explore the immediate vicinity of the hotel and get acclimatised to this bustling city. Alternatively, you may prefer to recover from your journey by relaxing beside the hotel pool. KE Land Only package services begin with the evening meal. Your guide will take dinner with you and will provide an informal briefing about the days ahead.

    • Accommodation Hotel with swimming pool

    • Meals d

  • A free day in Kathmandu with a guided sightseeing tour amongst Buddhist and Hindu temple sites.

    After giving our bikes a quick pre-trip check over today is a free day in Kathmandu for sightseeing and souvenir hunting. One of the attractions of any visit to Nepal is the chance to walk the streets of Kathmandu, which presents a fascinating mosaic of shops, cafes and restaurants, food markets and street vendors, as well as a bewildering array of colourful temples and shrines of both Buddhist and Hindu religions. As a part of the trip package we have included evening meals which we will take at popular restaurants in Kathmandu on each of the nights that we stay in the city.

    • Accommodation Hotel with swimming pool

    • Meals bld

  • Fly across the Nepal Himalaya to Lhasa (3660m). Meet the Tibetan team and transfer to a city hotel.

    After breakfast, we transfer to the airport and check in for the short flight to Lhasa. We fly up to Lhasa with our bikes and some basic kit to see us through the next couple of days until our main kit bags arrive overland from Kathmandu. Please note that there is a strictly enforced charge for excess baggage on this flight. The flight passes over the Khumbu region and affords excellent views of Mount Everest, Makalu and Kangchenjunga to the east (sit on the left hand side of the plane if you can). After landing at Lhasa Airport it is approximately an hour’s drive into the Tibetan capital, where we check in at our hotel. The 3660 metre altitude at Lhasa means that we will take things easy for the first 2 or 3 days.

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Meals bld

  • Acclimatisation and sightseeing in Lhasa. Visit the Jokhang Temple and amazing Potala Palace.

    A key acclimatisation day. In the morning we will make a leisurely investigation of the 7th Century Jokhang Temple, which is possibly the most sacred shrine in Tibet and is only a 20-minute walk from the hotel. The temple is made up of a large number of small chambers and chapels, each with its own significance. There is always a queue of devout Tibetans forming an orderly procession through the complex. We join this queue to gain access to the inner areas of the Jokhang. Surrounding the Jokhang is the maze of narrow cobbled streets and whitewashed houses that forms the central market of Lhasa. The pilgrims’ circuit around the Jokhang, which winds its way through the market streets, is known as the Barkor. During the course of their clockwise circumambulation of the Jokhang the pilgrims regularly stop to scrutinise the merchandise on the stalls that line both sides of their route. The Barkor is a fascinating glimpse of the Tibetan past. In the afternoon we visit the Potala Palace, the most spectacular of the sights of Lhasa. Built on a small outcrop known as ‘Red Hill’, the Potala Palace dominates the city of Lhasa. There has been a palace on this site since the 5th or 6th century, but the present palace was constructed in the 17th century during the reign of the fifth Dalai Lama. The Potala is a vast building, containing the private quarters of the Dalai Lama, numerous grand staterooms and many important chapels.

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Meals bld

  • Cycle out to the Sera Monastery. Afternoon for souvenir shopping or relaxing in a Barkor cafe.

    Another acclimatisation day, which we feel is essential before setting off on our journey. We’ll probably ride out the 15 km (9 miles) to the Sera Monastery. Sera is a fascinating complex of whitewashed walls, golden rooftops, philosophising monks and is one of the best-preserved monasteries in Tibet. High above the monastery is an exposed ridge, which is a sky burial site. This involves the deceased’s ritually dissected body being laid out to be carried away by vultures and other carrion. The afternoon is best spent souvenir shopping or in a cafe over-looking the Barkor and quietly watching Tibetan life pass by, possibly with a ‘Lhasa’ beer!

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Meals bld

  • Leaving Lhasa behind, cycle on recently laid tarmac to the foot (3800m) of the Khamba La.

    Before starting out on our epic journey we pack our gear onto our support vehicle, taking with us only the things which we are likely to need during the course of the day’s ride e.g. Camelbak, camera, windproof, spare tubes, etc. We set off on a relatively level and easy stage to the bottom of the Khamba La pass. The road is now very good, with recently laid tarmac. We set up our first camp of the holiday at the foot of the pass and at an altitude of 3800 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 100m

    • Distance 86km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 140m

    • Time 5 - 6 hrs cycling

  • Bike across the Khamba La (4794m) and drop down to the village of Nakartse.

    Today we cross the first of 6 major passes on our route - the Khamba La (4794m). At this early stage of the trip, we are not fully acclimatised and the 23 km (14 mile) climb and 1000 metres of ascent from our camp to the top of the pass is a considerable challenge. In recent years the majority of KE group members have managed to cycle the whole of today’s stage, although there is always the option of using the support vehicle. From the tarmac covered pass, there are dazzling views out across the deep turquoise waters of sacred Yamdrok Lake to the snowy summit of Nazin Kang Sa (7252m). During maximum snowmelt in the spring, several rivers flow into Yamdrok Lake but they dry up for most of the rest of the year and the lake has no permanent outflow. From the pass, we descend rapidly down to the lake and have lunch beside it, before riding on to a lovely campsite just before the village of Nakartse.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 1280m

    • Distance 72km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 400m

    • Time 7 - 8 hrs cycling

  • Bike across the Karo La (5050m) and descend via several villages to the base of the Simi La.

    From our camp, we can see distant mountains to the south of the lake, which are in Bhutan! Leaving Nakartse on tarmac, our route turns westwards and climbs to cross the Karo La (5050m) where there is the amazing sight of a huge glacier tumbling down to within a few hundred metres of the road. It’s a tough but rewarding ride from camp to the top of our first 5000 metre pass. Recently, a couple of our groups have managed to ride the whole of this long gradual ascent, although it’s reassuring to know the support vehicle is there if we need it. Descending from the pass, we take lunch near to the village of Ralung. We then continue on an undulating descent for 2 to 3 hours through a wonderful valley and by way of a series of colourful Tibetan villages, to a camp at the foot of our next pass, the Simi La.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 630m

    • Distance 69km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 820m

    • Time 6 - 7 hrs cycling

  • Cross the Simi La, then ride a mostly downhill stage to Gyantse (4055m). Afternoon at the Kumbum.

    Today we have a 15 km (9 mile) easily graded climb to the top of the Simi La and then an easy and mostly downhill stage of approximately 35 km (22 miles) to Gyantse (4055m). Gyantse is a very important town and was, until recently, the third largest settlement in Tibet. There are some very impressive military and religious sights at Gyantse. The commanding fort dates from the 15th Century when it was the seat of a powerful warlord. Sir Francis Younghusband and his troops occupied the fort for a month during his expedition to Tibet in 1904. The most famous and beautiful of Gyantse’s numerous monasteries is the spectacularly large and complex stupa that is known as the Kumbum. This gold-topped pyramid has been little damaged over the centuries and is one of the finest buildings in Tibet. The Buddhas which adorn its many chapels (there are 112 chapels in all) are especially fine. We will stay in the new Gyantse Hotel and have all afternoon to explore this fascinating town.

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Ascent 200m

    • Distance 36km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 430m

    • Time 3 hrs cycling

  • A morning’s cycle ride to Shigatse (3950m). Explore the amazing Tashilhunpo Monastery after lunch.

    Another fast section on perfect tarmac, means we can reach Shigatse easily in a morning’s ride. For once on this journey there are no hills, just vanishing points, as we follow the Nyang Chu River through scattered settlements and farmland. Arriving at Shigatse (3950m) we check in at the Shigatse Hotel, which has Tibetan-style rooms and good hot baths. Shigatse is Tibet’s second largest city and capital of the province of Tsang. In the afternoon, we will explore the Tashilhunpo monastic complex and the local market. A high wall surrounds the red and gold buildings that make up the Tashilhunpo Monastery and around this wall there is an important circumambulation route. This includes small shrines, significant rock inscriptions and many prayer wheels. The circuit can take less than an hour but takes much longer if you stop regularly to watch the goings on of the Tibetan pilgrims. Little remains of the Shigatse fortress, but the view from the top is spectacular.

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Ascent 100m

    • Distance 93km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 340m

    • Time 5 - 6 hrs cycling

  • A rest day. More time for monastery and market exploration and a second night in Shigatse.

    We spend a rest day at Shigatse, which gives us another opportunity to explore the fantastic Tashilhunpo Monastery complex. We spend a second night at our Shigatse hotel.

    • Accommodation Hotel

    • Meals bld

  • Cycle to a lunch stop besides the Ra Chu River, then on to the foot (4290m) of the Tso La.

    The new tarmac road out of Shigatse climbs gradually as it makes its way to the distant Tso La. A late lunch is taken at a pleasant site besides the Ra Chu River beyond the village of Chemo. If we’re lucky we won’t face a headwind on the afternoon’s undulating ride, through generally barren territory, with occasional irrigated fields and impressive roadside retaining walls. We set up our camp below the Tso La at 4290 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 670m

    • Distance 106km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 230m

    • Time 7 - 8 hrs cycling

  • Cross the Tso La (4500m) with views of the Himalaya. Then, cycle via Lhatse to the base of the Gyamtso La.

    It is a surprisingly easy climb to the top of the Tso La (4500m) where our reward is a first distant view of the main Himalaya Range - which we will eventually cross. It is then a fun blast on a quick, sharp descent, followed by a 2-hour tour across the plains to the small town of Lhatse, which has the feeling of a Wild West frontier town. Apart from its hot springs, Lhatse’s claim to fame is that the long road to western Tibet starts from a point a short distance west of town. A late lunch is taken beside the river at the far end of town and then it is another 2 to 3 hours and 620 metres of ascent to our camping site, part of the way up the long climb to the Gyamtso La. Altitude at camp is 4760 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 1100m

    • Distance 66km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 590m

    • Time 6 - 7 hrs cycling

  • Cross the Gyamtso La (5220m), descend to Shegar and turn towards Everest. Overnight at Chay Village.

    Today's pass, the Gyamtso La (5220m) is the highest on our route. It is a gradual climb over 13 km (8 miles) with occasional steep sections, from our camping place to the crest of the pass. This ride takes a gruelling 2 to 3 hours. The descent is at first hard work and frustratingly gradual but it eventually steepens into a downhill freewheel - if the wind is in our favour! We stop off for lunch beyond the pass. The scenery here is not to be rushed through. It is mind-blowing, as we round a bend to be confronted with our first views of Everest, Lhotse and Cho Oyu. More wild Tibetan settlements, isolated monasteries and meetings with nomadic herders make the riding to Shegar pass as if in a dream. After passing through two check posts in Shegar we begin our detour away from the main road towards Rongbuk and Mount Everest. We take the graded road, which is not tarmaced, towards the Pang La and set up our camp beyond Chay Village.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 560m

    • Distance 68km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 1040m

    • Time 5 - 6 hrs cycling

  • Cycle up to the Pang La (5150m) for Everest views. Descend to our camp near Choesang.

    We have allowed 3 days for our round trip to Everest Basecamp in the Rongbuk Valley - 2 days to cycle in and one day to ride out. The principal obstacle on the jeep road into the north side of Everest is the Pang La (5150m) and this is encountered around 17 km (11 miles) after leaving our camp. Recent improvements to the road - it has been resurfaced and the general angle has been lowered with the introduction of more hairpins - mean that it is now slightly easier to bike to the top, which takes 2 to 3 hours. The view from the top just about beats anything from any other road pass in the world. The whole Himalaya range from Makalu to Shishapangma is completely uninterrupted before us! To top this though the mountain biking is now the best so far. A sweet, steep, 6 km (4 miles) of excellent downhill riding before rejoining the dirt road with lots of switchbacks. There is a total of over 19 km (12 miles) of grin-inducing descent to the village of Tashi Dzong. After taking lunch beside the river, we continue to a pleasant camping spot just before Choesang at an altitude of 4454 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Distance 59km

    • Meals bld

    • Time 6 hrs cycling

  • Ride up the Rongbuk Monastery. Optional afternoon return ride to Everest Basecamp

    The day starts fairly easily along the river. Everest is lost from sight to begin with but, as we turn into the Rongbuk Valley, it returns and becomes increasingly impressive with every ascending corner turned. We reach Rongbuk Monastery after a steady ride of 3 to 4 hours and set up our highest camp at 5000 metres. After lunch, there is the option to ride to the site of the original basecamp of the first British expeditions on Everest, which is at an elevation of 5100 metres. This is an 8 km (5 mile) ride each way, on rough tracks.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Distance 40km

    • Meals bld

    • Time 4 - 5 hrs cycling

  • An early start for the ride back to the main road via the Lamma La. Bike through Tingri to Tsamda.

    With an early start, it’s possible to ride out of this remote place, via the Lamma La (5000m), and so complete the entire journey by bike. Even if you take the support vehicle to the top of the pass, it's impossible to resist getting the bikes off the lorry for the mega descent. Rough tracks take us down to a river crossing and a lunch stop with great views of Cho Oyu. It takes 3 hours to reach the top of the Lamma La by bike, or 2 hours by vehicle, and then a further 3 to 4 hours biking to reach the Friendship Highway. We bike through Tingri to our campsite and a very welcome bath in the form of a hot spring at the Tsamda Hot Spring and Snowleopard Lodge. Here, the locals have built a small enclosure around the main springs and charge a few Yuan for the use of a changing room. A deluxe indoor option is available for a few Yuan more. A lower and warmer campsite compared to the last 2 nights. Altitude at camp is 4385 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 680m

    • Distance 80km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 1300m

    • Time 7 - 8 hrs cycling

  • Tibetan Plateau cycling, with views of Everest and Cho Oyu. Overnight below the Lalung La.

    Today is an excellent and fairly short day’s ride. There is great scenery on this stretch, which is now back on tarmac road. There is usually, however, a headwind which makes things a little more challenging! It is 41 km (25 miles) to lunch, where we savour more superb views of Everest and Cho Oyu. After lunch, we have a shortish ride to our camp below the Lalung La, at an altitude of 4555 metres. This is an idyllic spot, with grass and crystal clear mountain streams.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 280m

    • Distance 56km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 80m

    • Time 4 hrs cycling

  • Cross the Lalung La, then the Thang La (5132m), with views of Shishapangma. Stop off close to Nyalam.

    Even though we are now all well acclimatised it is still hard work climbing this double pass. From camp, it is about 14 km (9 miles) to the first summit, the Lalung La (5020m) but we then drop down and have to regain that lost altitude on the climb to the summit of the main pass - the Thang La (5132m). It may seem repetitive to describe yet again another magnificent view, but this is just one of those trips. If conditions are clear, a photo-stop is a must at the summit prayer flags - on one side of the pass is the huge bulk of Shishapangma, the only 8000 metre peak which stands completely in Tibet, whilst on the other side of the pass is a unique panorama of the north faces of Cho Oyu, Menlungste and Gauri Shankar - and it’s not even lunch time yet! Looking down the other side of the pass we are staring at the largest downhill in the world and it will take us 3 days to descend from 5132 metres to 590 metres at the Sun Kosi River in Nepal. That’s over 4500 metres (close to 15,000 feet) of downhill over 145 km (90 miles) of road. The ride today from the pass is still quite hard work as the initial steep angle of descent eases and the wind is invariably against us. We camp just past the village of Nyalam. The altitude here is 3700 metres, our lowest camp since leaving Lhasa.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 990m

    • Distance 85km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 1750m

    • Time 6 - 7 hrs cycling

  • An epic day of descent, crossing into Nepal at Zangmu and continuing to the Borderlands Resort.

    Today is ‘The Big One’, a day of endless descent. We finally leave the cold and arid Tibetan Plateau and enter the warm jungles of Nepal. The contrast is immense and the day just unforgettable. The road is at first steep and rocky with lots of hairpin bends and our brakes will take a hammering on this section. The road enters a steep, narrow gorge with many waterfalls and the hillsides are covered with trees and plants in a myriad of colours. An initial 27 km (17 miles) of switchback descending through lush tropical scenery and waterfalls sees us arrive, complete with big grins, at the first checkpoint. After passing through the Chinese border check post at Zangmu, an awesome amount of descent still awaits, as we continue down to Kodari, where we cross the ‘Friendship Bridge’ and have lunch. Still descending, we finally reach the beautiful Borderlands Resort, which is right beside the Bhote Kosi River. This is a great place to chill out and have a beer. The altitude at Borderlands is just 900 metres.

    • Accommodation Camping

    • Ascent 280m

    • Distance 60km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 3020m

    • Time 4 - 5 hrs cycling

  • Short downhill ride, then up to Dhulikhel and a final short descent into Kathmandu.

    After all that descending our last day of riding will be tough, as there is 1400 metres of height to gain. Starting off downhill, the Nepalese scenery is beautifully green, as you ride along on ‘Nepali’ tarmac. There are a couple of good downhill sections and some climbs to endure, cruelly finishing with the 17 km (11 mile) drag up to Dhulikel. Perched on the very rim of the Kathmandu Valley, its location makes up for the effort we’ve put into the climb. All that’s left now, is our final descent into Kathmandu. After we have repacked our bikes for the return journey, we will finish with a celebration dinner to mark the end of an epic ride.

    • Accommodation Hotel with swimming pool

    • Ascent 1740m

    • Distance 103km

    • gps data View now

    • Meals bld

    • Descent 1430m

    • Time 6 - 7 hrs cycling

  • Departure day. Transfers to Kathmandu Airport are provided.

    KE Land Only package services end after breakfast at the hotel. Airport transfers are provided for all client departing on this day. There are lots of extensions that can easily be added to your holiday in india. Why not pre-book a 1-day excursion to the fabulous Taj Mahal, or a multi-day Rajathan experience, or a beach hotel break in Goa or Kerala. Contact our office for details.

    • Meals b

Holiday Information

  • An experienced professional local bike guide and for larger groups an additional KE Western biking leader
  • Kathmandu Airport transfers
  • Internal flights and all land transport involved in the itinerary
  • Support vehicles and drivers throughout the journey from Lhasa to Kathmandu
  • All accommodation as detailed in the trip dossier
  • All meals
  • 11 nights full service camping with food and all equipment (not personal equipment)
  • Guided sightseeing in Kathmandu and in Lhasa
  • Travel Insurance
  • Nepalese and Chinese visas
  • Tips for local bike guide and support crew
  • Miscellaneous expenses - drinks and souvenirs etc. Bike Carriage on the flights - please check with your carrier for charges

The food served during the trip is a mixture of local and Western, mostly purchased in Nepal and Tibet cooked for us by highly trained cooks. The emphasis is on providing a high-carbohydrate and largely vegetarian diet, which we have found to be easily digestible at high altitude. In Kathmandu we take our meals in the hotel and in local restaurants. All meals are included in the trip price.

All meals are included in the trip price from dinner on Day 1 through to breakfast on Day 21.
Himex will provide Kathmandu airport transfers for all flight arrivals and departures.
During this trip the group will spend 3 nights in Kathmandu at a centrally located tourist-class hotel. We will also spend 3 nights in hotel accommodation in Lhasa. En-route between Lhasa and Kathmandu we have 14 nights when we will either be camping or staying in basic hotels and lodges. All accommodation is arranged on a twin-sharing basis. If you are travelling by yourself you will be paired up with another single client of the same sex. It is possible to hire a single tent for this trip at an additional cost - PLEASE NOTE single tent hire does not include single rooms in hotels. Depending on availability, it may be possible to book a single room for your nights in Kathmandu and Tibet. For additional hotel prices and single supplement costs please refer to the dates and prices page of the trip on our website.

View the gallery below for images of the style of accommodation used

On the camping sections of this trip one of the cook crew will wake you shortly after first light with a cup of tea or coffee brought to your tent. You will have plenty of time to get up and pack your kitbag before sitting down to a hot breakfast, during which camp will be struck and the support vehicle will be packed. Depending on the day’s riding schedule, we will generally aim to set off around 9 am. and will make regular stops to regroup. We will usually break for a rest in a convenient spot mid morning and again in the afternoon. Our lunch stop is generally taken after we have completed over half of the day’s ride. The lunch break is a chance to relax and enjoy a packed lunch, prepared in advance by our crew. Our crew will normally have our camp established and the tents pitched before we arrive. Soup and hot and cold drinks will be available shortly after our arrival at camp. Any free time is usually spent relaxing and dealing with any bike maintenance that may be required. Dinner is a 3-course meal served in the mess tent. This is a great time of day for reliving the events of the trip so far and for general socializing. Most people choose to retire to bed early, perhaps after a beer or two.

An experienced professional Nepalese mountain bike guide will lead the group. Larger groups will also be accompanied by a KE Western bike guide. There will also be a Nepalese camp crew and one or more support vehicles with Chinese drivers.

Approximately £200 (or the equivalent in US$ or euros) should be allowed for miscellaneous expenses. You should also budget for two payments of Nepali departure tax - approx. £15 per departure - and approx. £50 for support crew tips. It is not necessary to obtain local currency prior to departure. Sterling, US dollars and euros are equally acceptable for exchange in Nepal. We recommend that you carry your travel money in the form of cash, since you will exchange the majority of this on the day of your arrival in Kathmandu. If you prefer not to carry all of your spending money in cash, it is possible to withdraw money from ATM's in Kathmandu, Lhasa, Gyantse and Shigatse using your debit or credit card.

Tipping is the accepted way of saying ‘thank you’ for good service. Tips do not form part of the wages of your support crew but they are very much appreciated. It is important to remember that tipping is voluntary and should be dependent on good service. Normally the tips are given at the end of the trek and this is best done as a group. Your group leader will give you help and advice on this. Most groups will give the tips with a bit of ceremony (or sometimes a party) on the last evening, to mark the end of the trip. As a guide, we recommend that each group member contribute around £50 to these tips. At the end of a trip many people also like to donate various items of their equipment to their crew, who work so hard to make the trip a success. Fleeces, gloves, hats, scarves and even socks (clean of course) are always warmly received by the crew, many of whom are farmers who earn extra cash by working for us. Bike clothing and equipment are highly prized by the local bike guides. If you think you would like to donate equipment at the end of your trip, your trek leader will make arrangements for a fair distribution among the crew.

Taking a bike on an aircraft is usually straightforward. Different airlines have differing policies with regard to baggage allowances and transporting bikes. We strongly advise that you check the current policy of your chosen airline for carrying bikes and their baggage allowances before purchasing your air ticket. The baggage section on your chosen airline’s website will usually contain this information. We suggest that you are aware of the weight and dimensions of your intended check-in baggage in advance of your arrival at the airport as airlines may charge for both excess and oversize baggage, or refuse to carry oversized baggage. If you are using a domestic flight to connect with your International flight then it is likely that a different baggage policy will exist for the domestic and international flight sections. Again you should check the baggage policy with your chosen domestic airline prior to booking your domestic flight tickets. Any additional charges incurred for transporting your bike on any of the flights required for this adventure (international, domestic and internal flights within the trip itinerary - if applicable) are the responsibility of each individual client. Kathmandu to Lhasa Flight The airline allows a single piece of check-in luggage up to 23kg in weight (plus 5kg hand baggage). Excess baggage is charged at $26 per kilo or $150 per bag (up to 23kg). These excess charges are applicable to all clients, whether travelling with their own bike or with a bike they have hired and picked up in Kathmandu. We attempt to overcome excess baggage charges on this flight by asking clients to send their KE trek bag overland with the support team and to pack (in their bike bag) only those few items that they will need for the first 2 days in Lhasa.

This is a ADVENTURE CYCLING. You can use a mid-level mountain bike, such as a Specialized Rockhopper Pro or a Trek 6500 Disc, equipped with suspension forks. Semi-slick tyres work well on long journeys of this type on variable tarmac roads and gravel jeep roads. Please call us if you are unsure about the suitability of your current bike. We cannot stress enough the importance of ensuring that your bike is in perfect working condition before you start this trip. You are depending on your bike to transport you throughout your trip, across demanding terrain. It is VITAL to ensure it is THOROUGHLY SERVICED to guarantee it is in good mechanical order before departure. If you are not mechanically minded, get your local bike mechanic to service it for you. For home mechanics, points to note particularly are:

a) Check rims and if they are worn / cracked / dented replace with a new rim / wheel to avoid wheel failure. It is especially important to check that the rims on rim-braked bikes are not worn concave by the brake blocks – replace them if they are.

b) Check wheels are true and spoke tension is tight.

c) Check and, if required, adjust / grease ALL bearings and quick release skewers.

d) Check and, if required, replace brake and gear cables.

e) Check disc / brake pads, mounts and cables / hydraulic lines - replace if necessary.

f) Check - lube / threadlock and tighten - all bolts (esp. suspension pivots, bottom brackets, disc rotor bolts and disc mount bolts).

g) Check chain, cassette and chain rings for wear – replace as necessary.

h) Make sure you have the right tyres, inner tubes and BIKE SPECIFIC SPARES for your bike.

Whilst not essential, it is a good idea that you familiarise yourself with how to carry out at least some basic repairs to your bike e.g. fixing a puncture, changing an inner tube. Naturally our bike guides will always be happy to assist with any repairs, but due to the often remote nature of our trips, being able to carry out a simple repair can save time and the inconvenience of waiting for assistance.

Travelling with a bike is usually as straightforward as travelling with any other type of baggage, providing you have packed it adequately. We have many years experience of travelling with our bikes, and nowadays we think that the best way to travel and fly with a bike is to partially dismantle it and put it into a purpose made soft bike bag. Although more expensive than a cardboard bike box, they are smaller in size to transport and are considerably easier to handle. To pack your bike you simply remove both wheels and pedals and prepare it for travel as follows. Obviously, extra care when packing your bike can minimise the chances of accidental damage occurring in transit. Ask your local bike store for plastic wheel hub protectors (which will prevent damage to your bike bag) and plastic fork and frame spacers, insert the spacers into the dropouts, tape them in place and then put extra padding over this area. Use pipe insulation lagging (from your local DIY store) to cover frame tubes, forks and seat post. If required, remove your bars from the stem and attach them carefully to your frame/forks using plastic ties or pvc tape -ensure that your Ergo/Sti levers are well padded to minimise the chance of damage. You may also wish to remove your rear gear mech, pad it with foam and tape it to the chainstay out of harm's way. Finally, you should partly deflate your tyres, but leave some air in them to help absorb any impact on the wheels. Don’t forget to pack wheel skewers, pedals and any bolts you have removed, these are the items that tend to get left behind. Finally, find an old cardboard bike box and cut out panels to fit inside your soft bike bag for extra protection. Don’t forget to bring sufficient packing materials to pack your bike on the way home. PLEASE DO NOT USE a purpose-made rigid bike box -these are heavy (which can put you over your baggage allowance) and are also too bulky to be easily stored or transported on the group’s support vehicle.

Throughout this trip we have the back up of one or more support vehicles. Each morning our main baggage will be loaded onto the support vehicle which will follow the group on the day's ride. The local biking leader and the support vehicle driver will watch over the group and will carry mobile phones, allowing you to contact them in the case of a breakdown or other incident. We want everyone to enjoy their cycling experience on this trip and we recognise the importance of group members being allowed to cycle at their own pace. So, although the group will become split up at times, we have regular stops to ensure that it's never long before we regroup. The support vehicle will pick up any group members who wish to take a break from cycling at any time.

We recommend that you take your own bike on this holiday. It is the bike you know best and will provide you with the best riding experience. However, it is possible to hire a bike locally. We have established a relationship with a bike hire company in Kathmandu who can provide Trek 4900 and Cube CMPT Acid mountain bikes at a cost of US$460 for the duration of the holiday. These are good quality aluminium framed bikes with 100mm suspension forks, Shimano components and Shimano hydraulic disc brakes. This cost will be paid locally and does not cover you if you lose the bike or damage it beyond 'fair wear and tear'. You may be required to pay a security deposit or provide your credit card details in advance, to cover potential loss of or damage to the bike. If you want to hire a bike, please contact the KE office and we can reserve one on your behalf. We must stress that your hire contract will be with the local hire company and that KE cannot be held responsible for any issues arising from bike hire. If you do hire a bike, we recommend that you take your own shoes, pedals and possibly even your saddle, which will go a long way towards making it feel like your own bike. You will also need to take your own helmet, which must be worn at all times when riding. One final issue with regard to the hire bikes is that they are fitted with regular knobbly tyres. Fast-rolling, semi-slick tyres are needed for the Lhasa to Kathmandu ride and you should take a pair with you on the holiday, as they will make your ride easier.

All KE clients will receive a FREE KE trek bag.  These have been specially made to stand up to the rigours of adventure travel.  Your KE bag will be posted to you when your trip is guaranteed to run or on receipt of your booking if the trip is already guaranteed.  If you have travelled with us before and already have a KE trek bag you can select an alternative free gift in the booking process.

This holiday involves going to very high altitude. During the course of your trip you will be spending at least one night above 4000 metres and/or trekking to 5000 metres or above. This is not something that you should worry about; the human body is quite capable of adapting to a very wide range of altitudes, but it is important that we follow some simple rules in order to acclimatise successfully. Before coming on this holiday you should read the advice on trekking at high altitude. Unless you have previous experience of trekking above 4000 metres you should consult one of our trekking experts before embarking on this holiday. On this trip we carry a portable altitude chamber (PAC-bag) and/or bottled oxygen for use in emergencies.

The following is a basic checklist to help you with your packing. We recommend using the layering principle of clothing for predominantly cool climatic conditions and cold evenings. Good padded cycling shorts are essential.
Your bike MUST be at least a mid level Mountain Bike such as a Specialized Rockhopper or Trek 6500. Front suspension is recommended but not essential. It is vital that your bike is THOROUGHLY SERVICED and in perfect working condition before the trip.

PERSONAL CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES

Feet

  • Stiff-soled cycling shoes or SPD’s

  • Neoprene over shoes for extra warmth

Torso

  • Base-layer

  • Short sleeve cycling top (x 2)

  • Mid-layer

  • Long sleeved cycling top (x 2)

  • Outer layer

  • Lightweight waterproof jacket

  • Warm Fleece jacket or jumper

  • Down Jacket (for evenings)*

Hands

  • Regular biking gloves

  • Winter biking gloves or warm over-gloves

Legs

  • Padded cycling shorts (x 2)

  • Warm Cycling tights or tracksters

Head

  • Biking glasses

  • Cycling helmet – mandatory

  • Fleece headband

  • Buff

Daypack and contents

  • A cycling daypack (e.g. Camelbak) of at least 20 litres total carrying capacity is recommended

  • Water bladder - min. 2 litres capacity

  • Lightweight waterproof top

  • Multi-tool

  • Puncture repair kit

  • Inner tube

  • Pump

  • Camera

  • Sun cream (inc total bloc for lips/nose)

  • Small roll of gaffer tape

  • Warm Fleece Jacket or Jumper

  • Lightweight loose trousers to wear over shorts for modesty

  • Basic First Aid Kit. Including: antiseptic cream, throat lozenges, diarrhoea treatment (Imodium), painkillers, plasters and blister treatment, Insect repellent, and re-hydration salts (Dioralite).

Trek Bag Contents

  • Travel and apres biking clothes for predominantly cold conditions

  • Trainers/Leisure shoes for aprrs biking

  • Wash bag, towel, toiletries, including anti-bacterial handwash

  • Warm hat

  • Insect repellent – (75 – 100% DEET)

  • Small padlock (to lock trek bag)

  • Sleeping bag (comfort rated -15°C)*

  • Thermarest/Camping Mattress *

  • Headtorch and spare batteries

  • Swimwear

Equipment hire: Items marked with a * can be rented through KE Adventure Travel

PERSONAL TOOLS AND SPARES

You should bring the following with you as a minimum. Whilst not essential, it is a good idea that you familiarise yourself with how to carry out at least some basic repairs e.g. fixing a puncture, changing an inner tube. Naturally the bike guide will always be happy to assist with any repairs, but due to the often remote nature of our trips, being able to carry out a simple repair can save time and inconvenience waiting for assistance.

  • Tyres – for this trip you will need 1.9 to 2.2 inch semi-slick tyres suitable for mostly dry tarmac/dirt road conditions.

  • Pump

  • Plastic tyre levers

  • Small tube of grease

  • 1 rear brake cable

  • 1 rear gear cable

  • Spare set of brake blocks / disc pads (front and rear)

  • 2 spare spokes for front and rear wheels

  • Spoke key

  • 4 x inner tubes Spare chain links

  • Liquid chain lube (bottle not aerosol)

  • Multi-tool with Allen keys

  • Chain link extractor (if not on multi-tool)

  • 2x puncture repair kits

  • A rag and brush for cleaning bike and drive train.

  • Spares specific to your bike **

KE tools and spares - On all of our trips we carry a toolkit and a basic range of spares for emergencies. As bikes become increasingly part specific it is impossible to carry a comprehensive range of spares compatible with all makes and models of bike.

** Please ensure you bring any bike-specific spares which might be needed - such as disc brake bleed kits (and appropriate fluid), shock pumps etc).

BIKE HIRE

It is possible to hire bikes for this trip. Suitable bikes available are: Trek 4900 and Cube CMPT Acid, each of which has 100mm suspension forks, Shimano component, a triple chainset and hydraulic disc brakes. The cost of bike hire is noted in the Bike Hire section of the trip notes. When you request bike hire, KE will ensure that a suitably sized bike is available for collection and you will collect and pay for the bike directly on arrival in Kathmandu. Please note that your contract for bike hire is directly with the hire company in Kathmandu and not with KE. Please inform us in advance if you wish to hire a bike for this trip and let us know your frame size. If you are hiring a bike we recommend that you bring your own saddle and pedals, as well as your helmet.

Please do not hesitate to call us for further advice about what to bring or any other aspect of this trip. We are more than happy to offer you the benefit of our experience. Further helpful information can also be found in the Your Bike, Baggage Allowances, Climate and Travelling with Your Bike sections of the detailed trip notes.

 

For each holiday there is a minimum number of participants required to enable it to go ahead. Once the minimum number is reached, the trip status will change from 'Available' to 'Guaranteed to run'. You can check the trip status for each departure in ‘Dates and Prices’ table. Other than in exceptional circumstances, we will not cancel a trip once it has achieved this guaranteed to run status and so you are free to proceed with your international flight booking and other travel arrangements.

A passport with 6 months remaining validity at the end of your stay is generally required. The information that we provide is for UK passport holders. Please check the relevant embassy or consulate for other nationalities. It is your responsibility to ensure that you have the correct travel documents and visas for your holiday. Visa requirements and charges are subject to change without notice. If you are travelling outside the EU you should have at least 2 blank pages in your passport for each country that you visit.

Visa Tibet (China) from Nepal

It is important that you do not make your own arrangements for the China visa since the group must enter Tibet on a group visa. We will make all arrangements for the group visa and include the cost of this ($175 for US citizens, $85 for all other nationalities) on your invoice. In order for our agents to process the group visa we will require the following information:

  • Your: Name; marital status; current occupation; employers’ name, address and phone number.
  • Your emergency contact with the following details: Their name; nationality; occupation; relationship to you and telephone number.
  • A copy of the information page(s) of your passport and a recently taken passport sized photo (colour scans of these documents will suffice).

You should send all the above information to us as soon as possible and no later than 6 weeks prior to departure.

Visa Nepal

All nationalities require a visa. The visa fee is $25 for 15 days, $40 for 30 days, $100 for 90 days and is obtainable on arrival. Payment must be made in cash and USD, GBP or Euros are accepted. You will require 2 passport photos.

For all the regions of Nepal that we visit an additional permit is required. This is included in the holiday price and KE will apply for it, with your full passport details and 1 passport photo (sent by post or emailed). You must supply this to us at least 4 weeks prior to departure.

For the following holidays, in addition to the above, we will also require you to supply a copy of the information page of your passport (sent by post or emailed).

These trips are: Kanchenjunga (KAN), Mustang (MUS), Dolpo (DOL), Manaslu (MAN), Hidden Valleys of Naar and Phu (NAP), Naar to Mustang (NTM), Humla and Limi Circuit Trek (HUM), Naya Kanga and the Ganja La (NKG), Yala Peak and the Ganja La (YPGL), Tent Peak (TPK), Ramdung and Parchemo (RAM), Mera Peak, Island Peak and the Amphu Labsta (MIP), Island Peak Climber (IPC), Peaks and Passes on Nepal (MTR); Mera Peak Climb (MER); and Chulu Far East & the Tilicho La (CTL); Tabsar Peak and the Tsum Valley (TVC), Mukot Peak (MKP).

You should contact your doctor or travel clinic to check whether you require any specific vaccinations or other preventive measures. You should be up to date with routine courses and boosters as recommended in the UK e.g. diphtheria-tetanus-polio and measles-mumps-rubella, along with hepatitis A and typhoid. Malarial prophylaxis is not usually required for trips in the mountains, however if you are visiting rural and remote low lying areas then they might be necessary. On holidays to more remote areas you should also have a dentist check up. A good online resource is Travel Health Pro.

Politically part of China, the unit of currency in Tibet is the Chinese Yuan Renminbi. 

The unit of currency in Nepal is the Nepalese Rupee.

We recommend you check if you require an adaptor for your electrical items at:

http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity/plugs-and-sockets/

The better conditioned you are the more you will enjoy your trip. We suggest that you adopt a sensible weekly exercise regime and fit in a number of long cycle rides in hilly country to ensure you are physically capable of taking part in this trip - this will also provide you with an opportunity to make sure all your riding kit is tried and tested before you travel. Cycling is obviously the best activity to prepare for this trip, however, running, squash and swimming are also good for developing aerobic fitness and stamina.

As a reputable tour operator, KE supports the British Foreign & Commonwealth Offices ‘Know before you go’ campaign to enable British citizens to prepare for their journeys overseas, and we recommend that all KE travellers take a look at the FCO Travel Advice for their chosen destination on the official FCO website: www.fco.gov.uk. North Americans can also check out the U.S. Department of State website: www.travel.state.gov for essential travel advice and tips.

KE treat the safety and security of all clients as the most important aspect of any trip we organise. We would not run any trip that we did not consider reasonably safe.  Should the FCO advise against travel for any reason, we will contact everyone booked to travel to discuss the situation.  We receive regular updates direct from the FCO and are in constant touch with our contacts on the ground.  If you have any questions about government travel advice, please call our office.

At the time of each of our Lhasa to Kathmandu departures, we will encounter relatively mild daytime temperatures of between 10 and 20 degrees Centigrade. At night the temperatures will fall to close to freezing point (and at our highest camp in the Rongbuk Valley possibly as low as minus 10 degrees Centigrade). Tibet is sheltered (by the Greater Himalaya) from the full effects of the monsoon and receives very little precipitation at any time of the year. The weather should be excellent at the time of any of our departures, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, with blue skies and brilliantly clear visibility. However, weather in mountainous areas is notoriously difficult to predict, and short-lived storms can occur at any time of the year.

  • Lonely Planet Guide to Nepal. Lonely Planet

  • Rough Guide to Nepal. Rough Guides

  • Cycling to Xian and other Excursions. Michael Buckley

  • The Tibet Guide. Stephen Batchelor

  • Trespassers on the Roof of the World. Peter Hopkirk

  • Tibet and its History. Hugh Richardson

  • A Cultural History of Tibet. Snellgrove and Richardson

  • Seven Years in Tibet. Heinrich Harrer

Kathmandu to Lhasa: Himalayan Maphouse. 1:700,000

This map is s dedicated cycling map of the entire route. It includes the central part of southern Tibet, northern Nepal, Sikkim and Bhutan and is centred on Lhatse. It has full detail of the area between Lhasa and Kathmandu. Also included is a street plan of Lhasa.

Extend Your Holiday

Extensions

When booking your holiday, you will be able to 'add an extension option'.

Once we have received your booking we will contact you to discuss additional services required for the extension and to take any additional deposit.

Chitwan Jungle Extension

The jungles of southern Nepal are an interesting counterpoint to trekking in the foothills or the high Himalaya. Tiger Tops Tharu Lodge provides a relaxing and comfortable base for a wildlife safari and cultural village experience. During two days of wildlife viewing in the Chitwan National Park 'buffer zone' - the interface area between visitors and the animals that live at Chitwan – you will be accompanied by expert guides on safaris by jeep by boat and on foot. 



Chitwan Jungle Extension

From $1100 per person

More info

Kathmandu Tour - Nagarkot and Bhaktapur

The Kathmandu Valley contains the cities of Patan, Bhaktapur and Kathmandu itself, all of which were once independent kingdoms. An exploration of the valley’s historic and cultural sights is an excellent way to begin or end your adventure in Nepal. Highlights of this tour includes a very early drive up to Nagarkot on the Kathmandu Valley rim, the perfect place to watch a Himalayan sunrise. This is followed by a tour of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bhaktapur, renowned for its temples and traditional buildings. 

 

Kathmandu Tour - Nagarkot and Bhaktapur

From $145 per person

More info

Malla Hotel

From $100 per room per night

Gokarna Forest Resort Kathmandu

From $138 per room per night

Shanker Hotel

From $100 per room per night

Situated next to the grounds of the former Royal Palace and only a 10-minute walk from the popular Thamel district, this former Rana residence was converted into a hotel in 1964. The original architecture was based on a French palace and the hotel has a grand appearance. Set in a large and beautifully tended garden, it provides a hideaway from the hustle and bustle of city life and is an ideal base from which to explore Kathmandu. All its rooms which are en-suite have been recently refurbished and the hotel facilities include 2 restaurants, 2 bars and a swimming pool where you can also order drinks.

Shangri La

From $119 per room per night Another of Kathmandu’s original ‘luxury’ hotels. While the sophistication of its amenities may be upstaged by Kathmandu’s more modern concrete and glass hotels, the Shangri La maintains an old world charm that cannot be beaten. Located in the diplomatic enclave of Lazimpat, away from the hustle and bustle yet just 10 minutes walk from tourist centre of Thamel, the hotel is set in a pleasant garden and facilities include a pool, tennis court and massage therapist. The hotel has a speciality Indian restaurant and a garden café serving international cuisine as well as a bar.

Dwarikas Hotel

From $279 per room per night Dwarika’s is a heritage hotel modelled on the grandeur of the palaces of the Newar Kings. Consisting of several buildings arranged around a quiet courtyard, the hotel incorporates many original 15th – 17th century features in its architecture from the lifetime collection of its founder. The rooms are in the same Newari style and lavishly luxurious in their appointments. Its location close to Pashupathinath and Bouddhanath is perfect for exploring this side of Kathmandu. There are 3 restaurants serving Nepali, Japanese and international cuisine, a bar, spa and fitness centre, and a swimming pool.

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