Far out in the North Atlantic Ocean, Iceland is a large island, approximately 300 kilometres north to south and 500 kilometres east to west. Featuring a deeply indented coastline, extensive ice-caps, active volcanoes and a language that has changed little in the 1000 years since the arrival of the first Norse settlers, Iceland is a magical adventure travel destination. The almost uninhabited south-central region of the Fjallabak is the focus of attention for trekking, climbing, family and mountain biking groups. Here, beneath the steaming summit of Mount Hekla, there are geysers, hot springs, towering waterfalls and some of the wildest terrain in Europe. Only in coastal regions has Iceland's volcanic landscape been softened by the activities of man. Here, in isolated pockets of settlement, there are pretty harbours, quaint houses and flower-filled pastures. Highlights include; whale-watching, climbing Hvannadalshnukur (2119m / 6952ft), Iceland's highest peak, visiting a puffin colony, travelling to glacier lagoon (scene of 2 James Bond films) and trying out Reykjavik's geo-thermally heated Blue Lagoon swimming pool.

Geography

Situated in a remote location in the North Atlantic Ocean, Iceland is a mysterious and wonderful country of great contrast. It is a big island, extending almost 300 kms. (185 miles) north to south and 500 kms. (310 miles) east to west. Its coastline is deeply indented by fjords and bays and extends to over 6000 kms. in length. Put in basic geographical terms, Iceland is a plateau, averaging 610 metres in height (2000ft.), with vast ice fields covering its highest parts. The largest of these is Vatnajökull in the southeast. The southern coasts are low-lying and without natural harbours. The high inland plateau is ringed with high mountains and peaks, the highest of which is Hvannadalshnúkur, at 2119 metres (6952ft.), in the southern glacier of Öræfajökull. The unusual landscape of this dramatic island is made up of volcanoes, hot springs, glaciers and tortured lava formations. Only in coastal regions has this harsh environment been softened by the activities of man. Here, in isolated pockets of settlement, there are pretty harbours, quaint houses and flower-filled pastures. With a population of fewer than 300,000 people and a land area of almost 40,000 square miles, Iceland is one of the least populated parts of Europe. Almost four-fifths of the country is uninhabited, the population being limited to a narrow coastal belt and to a number of valleys and lowland plains in the south and southwest. The interior of the country remains one of Europe’s great wilderness areas.

Time Zone

The time in Iceland is GMT + 0 hours.